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Forpus coelestis: Yellam green

Forpus coelestis: Yellam green

By Dirk Van den Abeele

Ornitho-Genetics VZW
MUTAVI, Research & Advice group

It was at the end of 1980 when in the USA an ‘almost yellow’ Forpus coelestis was born [1].  The fact that this new mutation had dark eyes, could immediately exclude the possibility of an ino form.   With an ino mutation, it is typically that besides a visual reduction of the eumelanine presence (the dark pigment in the feathers), resulting in a yellow bird, thus the eyes can also not have the normal dark colour, but they are red coloured [2, p. 345].  Not only these red eyes are absent with this mutation, also the body colour is not yellow like a ino is, but is generally described as ‘light yellowgreen’.

Red lovebirds, a mutation?

Red lovebirds, a mutation?
[Genus Agapornis]

By Dirk Van den Abeele
(16-02-2005)
(updated 13/12/2007)

It was around 1980 when I first came across a ‘red’ love bird in a shop. It was a lutino A. roseicollis hen which for some reason was coloured almost completely red. The result was an almost completely red bird, with red eyes, white primaries and an occasional yellow feather. At that point I did not know whether this was a mutation or not. I thought it was a normal mutation and bought the bird. I was convinced that this would enable me to start breeding red birds but that was not the case. After about 6 months the bird died without having produced offspring. I vowed that if I ever got the chance I would buy another specimen and to start a blood line.

On request: Blue, aqua and turquoise mutations in Lovebirds

Blue, aqua and turquoise mutations in Lovebirds

Published in BVA Magazine 2014

By Dirk Van den Abeele
MUTAVI, Research & Advice group
Ornitho-Genetics VZW

Translated by Daniel Nuyten

Blue.
The first blue colour mutation in parakeets most likely appeared in budgerigars. Reports of blue budgies already date back to 1878 when one was born by a breeder in Belgium. (van der Linden, 2002, p.9).
However, this wasn’t the only species where blue birds showed up. During the years blue mutations appeared in many species. In lovebirds they found the first blue Agapornis personatus in a shipment of imported birds from Tanganyika (Tanzania) to England in 1927 (SETH-SMITH, 1932). Blue A. fischeri, A. nigrigenis and A. lilianae were acquired through transmutations. There are also *blue* Agapornis roseicollis, but everyone knows by now that this is a selection type of turquoise, so genetically not a true blue mutation.

On request: English translation The marbled – greywing mystery (aka quartz)

The marbled – greywing mystery

Written by Dirk Van den Abeele, translated by Evy Dens
Ornitho-Genetics VZW
MUTAVI, Research & Advice group

I don’t think that there is one mutation in Agapornis roseicollis that has had so much name changes than marbled.
The first marbled A. roseicollis was most likely born in America. We can deduce this from the original name of the mutant. In the early stages, one spoke of the “American golden cherry”, which was a deformation of the American cherryhead or simply the American yellow or American yellow pastel. When the first marbled appeared in the aqua and turquoise series, names such as silver, silver cherry etc surfaced. Overall there was enough variation.

Parblue mutations – PPR partial psittacine reduction

Lots of breeders are asking questions about possible new alleles of the blue locus in ringnecks.
I am afraid that the answer to this question is not that easy. Till now, only 2 “parblue” loci are recognized: aqua and turquoise. That doesn’t mean that other alleles are not possible. The only problem is how to determine that a particular phenotype is indeed a new allele, because a PPR (partial psittacine reduction) mutation is not as simple as we might think.

The blue colors seen in feather barbs of several bird species is produced by interference. But not only this interference has its influence on the final color, lots of other factors can change the visual color of a feather, so also a parblue feather.